Last edited by Mozragore
Sunday, October 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of The Port and trade of early Elizabethan London, documents found in the catalog.

The Port and trade of early Elizabethan London, documents

The Port and trade of early Elizabethan London, documents

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  • 31 Currently reading

Published by London Record Society in [Leicester] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain,
  • London (England),
  • England,
  • London
    • Subjects:
    • Harbors -- England -- London -- History -- 16th century -- Sources.,
    • Great Britain -- History -- Elizabeth, 1558-1603 -- Sources.,
    • London (England) -- Commerce -- History -- Sources.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statementedited by Brian Dietz.
      SeriesLondon Record Society. Publications,, v. 8, Publications (London Record Society) ;, v. 8.
      ContributionsDietz, Brian, ed.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHE558.L8 P57
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxiii, 195 p.;
      Number of Pages195
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5339288M
      ISBN 100900952059
      LC Control Number72192900
      OCLC/WorldCa570900

      Britain’s involvement in the transatlantic trade in enslaved people from West Africa to the Americas began during the reign of Elizabeth I. John Hawkins – a merchant adventurer and later a naval administrator – was the first English trader. The theatre was popular with all classes- for popular plays it was known for queues of people to form waiting to see the performance. Poor people could pay 1 penny to stand in the pit and watch the performance, whereas the rich would pay for the expensive seats- directly above the stage was the most expensive place to sit- it wasn't the best view of the action, but the important thing was.

      The Merchant Fleet of Late Medieval and Tudor England, – In such cases we can narrow these places down by looking at the careers of ships and shipmasters in the documents that record these place names fully, or record the county they are in, and use these to identify the port (i.e. Ilfracombe; Combe Martin, or Combe in Cornwall. ELIZABETHAN TRADEA3 from other evidence are known to have been not too wide of the mark.' In France at the same period, a government official drew up one of the most remarkable documents of the age, giving elaborate information upon the direction, nature, quantity and balance of payments of French foreign trade in the I's.

      Triangular trade thus provides a method for rectifying trade imbalances between the above regions. navigation in the English mathematician Thomas Harriot worked out a simpler way using the sun the true sailing direction of a ship. this made voyages much safer, more direct and faster. THE HISTORY OF THE PORT OF LONDON – A VAST EMPORIUM OF ALL NATIONS is the fascinating story of the rise and fall and revival of the commercial river. The only book to tell the whole story and bring it right up to date, it charts the foundation, growth and evolution of the port and explains why for centuries it has been so important to Britain.


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The Port and trade of early Elizabethan London, documents Download PDF EPUB FB2

20 rows  The Port and Trade of Early Elizabethan London: Documents. Edited by Brian Dietz. London Record Society, volume 8. A calendar of the /8 London Port Book, detailing imports in London, plus related documents. London Record Society. Originally published by. Get this from a library.

The Port and trade of early Elizabethan London, documents. [Brian Dietz;] -- A calendar of the /8 London Port Book, detailing imports in London, plus related documents. The Port and Trade of Elizabethan London: Documents (London Record Society) (Volume 8) by Brian Dietz (Editor) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The Port and Trade of Early Elizabethan London: Documents. Originally published by London Record Society, London, Originally published by London Record Society, London, This free content was digitised by double rekeying and sponsored by London Record Society.

Buy The port and trade of early Elizabethan London: documents by Brian Dietz (editor) (Paperback) online at Lulu. Visit the Lulu Marketplace for product details, ratings, and reviews.

The Port and trade of early Elizabethan London, documents / edited by Brian Dietz. [Brian (ed.) Documents book on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. An index of ports is available at The National Archives in Kew. It is on pages of the E list in the printed version of the catalogue.

It is helpful to know that: although s port books documents book survived, many are in a poor state of preservation and there are many gaps.

For example, there are no London port books for   Buy The Port and Trade of Elizabethan London: Documents by Brian Dietz from Waterstones today.

Click and Collect from your local Waterstones Pages: Filed under: Harbors -- England -- London -- History -- 16th century -- Sources.

The Port and Trade of Early Elizabethan London: Documents, ed. by Brian Dietz (HTML at British History Online) Items below (if any) are from related and broader terms.

Filed under: Archives. The Overseas Trade of London: Exchequer Customs Accounts,ed. by Henry S. Cobb (HTML at British History Online) The Port and Trade of Early Elizabethan London: Documents, ed.

by Brian Dietz (HTML at British History Online) Items below (if any) are from related and broader terms. The Port and Trade of Elizabethan London Documents. Brian Dietz [ed] Published by Condition: New. Language: English. Brand new Book. A calendar of the /8 London Port Book, detailing imports in London, plus related documents.

The port and trade of early Elizabethan London. Documents. DIETZ, BRIAN. Published by. Elizabethan explorers undertook lengthy expeditions to discover new worlds. Liza Picard considers some of the consequences of these expeditions: overseas colonies, imported goods and the slave trade.

Exploration and trade in Elizabethan England - The British Library. During the Middle Ages London was a small port on an island at the periphery of Europe. From the end of the Tudor period that began to change and by the 18 th century it had become the country’s leading financial centre, the capital of a growing empire and a major port at the centre of the world.

Public Record Office, E /, rot. ; The Port and Trade of Early Elizabethan London: Documents, ed. Dietz, London Record Society, 8 (), x, pp. ; "Dikes, Dockheads and Gates: English Docks and Sea Power in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries", Mariner's Mirror, lxxxviii (), The Port and Trade of Early Elizabethan London: Documents (London: London Record Society, ), The eco-nomic context can by gauged by reference to Dietz’s analysis of imports for the year – total imports into London amounted to.

This article is excerpted from the book, 'A History of the British Nation', by AD Innes, published in by TC & EC Jack, London.I picked up this delightful tome at a second-hand bookstore in Calgary, Canada, some years ago. Since it is now more than 70 years since Mr Innes's death inwe are able to share the complete text of this book with Britain Express readers.

Early soap-makers in England did not have easy access to laurel oil and therefore dropped it from their formulations, thereby creating an olive-oil soap now known as Castile soap. Importations of "Castile soap" through Antwerp appear in the London port books of –, [5] though the Oxford English Dictionary has no references to "Castile.

A tax of 1/- a chaldron was levied on coal brought into the Port to help defray the cost of the rebuilding of London, including new port accommodation on improved lines. It may be remarked that up to the time of the Fire, London straggled along the waterside, the river being the main highway for passengers and goods and the limits of the City.

Shakespeare’s London was home to a cross-section of early modern English culture. Its populace of roughlypeople included royalty, nobility, merchants, artisans, laborers, actors, beggars, thieves, and spies, as well as refugees from political and religious persecution on the continent. From Shakespeare, Anthony Burgess, The city meant roughly what we mean by the City of London--a crammed commercial huddle that smells the river.

The Thames was everybody's thoroughfare. The Londoners of Chaucer's time had had difficulty bridging it; the Elizabethans had achieved only London Bridge. in London certainly as early aswhen in June of that year he imported 79 cwt.

of sugar from Lisbon In the same Port Book we meet with Simon Rodrigues,27 who, as we know from Edgar Samuel's Belgian documents,28 was in Antwerp in October His imports of sugar in came to almost?1, and in his pepper.The Port and Trade of Early Elizabethan London: Documents Brian Dietz 7: The Cartulary of Holy Trinity, Aldgate Gerald A J Hodgett 6: The London Eyre of Helena M.

Chew and Martin Weinbaum 5: London Radicalism, a selection from the papers of Francis Plaice D.J. Rowe 4.

70 This compels me to try and unravel the interlocking criticisms which F. M. Heichelheim has leveled against my several contributions to Trade and Market in the Early Empires, (in his review of that work in Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, III, Pt.I [April i], —10).

Unfortunately, the conceptual system developed in that work had, as he avowed, no interest Cited by: